MEN AND FAMILIES – Keeping Boys and Men Healthy

Men’s Health Week 10-16 June 2019.

Why Men’s Health?

All this emphasis on the health of boys and men – what’s that about? They’re alright, aren’t they?

In many cases, the answer is no.

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Improving men’s health outcomes is a two-way process involving men, women and families, and health services combined.

It is important that men make use of health services to preventatively manage their health and find out before it’s too late if problems exist. But equally, health services need to know how to reach out to, communicate with and engage with men to be effective in helping them when they do come through the door.

It’s a two-way process that is about creating environments that support the ability of men to access healthcare effectively and support health services to treat men effectively.

Here are some ideas to how both parties can create an environment that enables each to improve men’s health outcomes:

Men, Women And Families

  • Be active in getting medical help if you don’t feel well, have a problem that won’t go away or notice unusual symptoms.
  • It’s OK to seek help – don’t try to do everything on your own or bury problems. Talk to your wife, friends and workmates.
  • Push hard to get the help you need to manage your life, work, family and financial needs.
  • Ladies, be proactive in helping your men and boys get the help they and you need. Use available hotlines, speak with professionals to get the best course of action and be persistent.
  • Don’t leave it too late to seek help. Fear is not a killer.